Air-Conditioning Basics

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How Your A/C Works

Air-conditioning includes both the cooling and heating of the air. It also cleans the air and controls the moisture level. An air conditioner is able to cool a building because it removes heat from the indoor air and transfers it outdoors. A chemical refrigerant in the system absorbs the unwanted heat and pumps it through a system of piping to the outside coil. The fan, located in the outside unit, blows outside air over the hot coil, transferring heat from the refrigerant to the outdoor air.
 
Basic operations:
  • A compressor
  • An expansion valve or metering device
  • An evaporator coil and blower
  • A chemical refrigerant
Most air-conditioning systems have five mechanical components:

Most central air-conditioning units operate by means of a split system. They consist of a hot side, or the condensing unit — including the condensing coil, the compressor and the fan — which is situated outside your home, and a cold side that is located inside your home. The cold side consists of an expansion valve and a cold coil, and it’s usually part of your furnace or some type of air handler. The furnace blows air through an evaporator coil, which cools the air. Then this cool air is routed throughout your home by means of a series of air ducts. A window unit operates on the same principle, the only difference being that both the hot side and the cold side are located within the same housing unit.
 
The compressor is controlled by the thermostat and is the heart of the system. It acts as the pump, causing the refrigerant to flow through the system. Its job is to draw in a low-pressure, low-temperature, refrigerant in a gaseous state, and by compressing this gas, raise the pressure and temperature of the refrigerant. This high-pressure, high-temperature gas then flows to the condenser coil.
 
The condenser coil is a series of piping with a fan that draws outside air across the coil. As the refrigerant passes through the condenser coil and the cooler outside air passes across the coil, the air absorbs heat from the refrigerant, which causes the refrigerant to condense from a gas to a liquid. The high-pressure, high-temperature liquid then reaches the expansion valve.
 
The expansion valve is the brain of the system. By sensing the temperature of the evaporator, or cooling coil, it allows liquid to pass through a very small orifice, which causes the refrigerant to expand to a low-pressure, low-temperature gas. This cold refrigerant flows to the evaporator coil.
 
The evaporator coil is a series of piping connected to a furnace or air handler that blows indoor air across it, causing the coil to absorb heat from the air. The cooled air is then dispersed throughout the house through ducts. The refrigerant then flows back to the compressor where the cycle starts again.
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Have us install a 16 SEER or higher split system and you can receive a factory rebate up to $1,300.
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